Last edited by Dilrajas
Thursday, October 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis D.C. in Tanzania found in the catalog.

ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis D.C. in Tanzania

S. B. Boaler

ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis D.C. in Tanzania

by S. B. Boaler

  • 264 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by H.M.S.O. in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Tanzania.
    • Subjects:
    • Pterocarpus angolensis.,
    • Botany -- Tanzania.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 125-128.

      Statementby S.B. Boaler.
      SeriesGt. Brit. Ministry of Overseas Development. Overseas research publication,, no. 12, Overseas research publication ;, no. 12.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQK495.L52 B6
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 128 p.
      Number of Pages128
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5976186M
      LC Control Number66002362

      The interactive key allows access to the character list, illustrations, full and partial descriptions, diagnostic descriptions, differences and similarities between taxa, lists of taxa exhibiting specified attributes, summaries of attributes within groups of taxa, and geographical distribution. Pterocarpus angolensis (kiaat) is a well-known southern African tree species valued for its timber (Lowore ) and use in several traditional medicinal applications (Coates Palgrave ). In South Africa, the species is protected by state law (Krynauw ) while in Tanzania a minimum.

      Pterocarpus angolensis grows throughout northern Botswana and may be found in all woodland types as well as in evergreen and deciduous forests. It is among the few indigenous trees that thrive in the deep Kalahari sands. P. angolensis produces a hard wood timber of attractive appearance. Due to its flexibility, resistance andlightweight, the communities in Botswana use the species for making. Pterocarpus. Pterocarpus angolensis DC. Pterocarpus angolensis DC. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a species in the genus Pterocarpus (family Leguminosae). The record derives from ILDIS (data supplied on ) which reports it .

      Pterocarpus tinctorius is a useful timber tree, providing a fair quality wood that is an interesting substitute for the wood of Pterocarpus angolensis, the latter being subject to unsustainable harvesting in many r, Pterocarpus tinctorius has been studied insufficiently, and it is difficult to determine its prospects as a commercial timber tree under sustainable management.   The number of termite species in the world is more than , and Africa with more than species has the richest intercontinental diversity. The family Termitidae contains builders of great mounds up to 5 m high. Colonies are composed of casts: a queen, a king, soldiers and workers. Some species of termite cultivate specialised fungi to digest cellulose. Termites constitute 10% of all.


Share this book
You might also like
Pray in this way

Pray in this way

Digital Electronics

Digital Electronics

Alaryngeal speech rehabilitation

Alaryngeal speech rehabilitation

Soviet cosmonaut team

Soviet cosmonaut team

So young, so fair

So young, so fair

Alone

Alone

Recent technical literature relevant for the hydrologists of the country

Recent technical literature relevant for the hydrologists of the country

Effects of body condition and pre-lambing supplementation on ewe productivity

Effects of body condition and pre-lambing supplementation on ewe productivity

Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire

William Wilberforce

William Wilberforce

Karmaveer Bhauarao Patil and mass education movement

Karmaveer Bhauarao Patil and mass education movement

Ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis D.C. in Tanzania by S. B. Boaler Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy The ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis DC in Tanzania (Great Britain. Ministry of Overseas Development. Overseas research publications;no) on FREE SHIPPING on.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Boaler, S.B. Ecology of Pterocarpus Angolensis D.C. in Tanzania. London, H.M.S.O., (OCoLC) Pterocarpus angolensis is an important timber tree of the miombo woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa.

The species only grows in natural mixed forests and little is known about is productivity potential. Pterocarpus angolensis (African teak, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zaire, Zimbabwe,and Zambia. Ecology. Pterocarpus angolensis grows in southern and eastern Africa over a wide range of localities where there is a dry season contrasting with a wet season.

It grows best where it is warm and free of : Fabaceae. Pterocarpus angolensis, Pristine population, Stem circumference, Crown health, Propagules. Introduction. Pterocarpus angolensis DC is an angiosperm plant that belongs to the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae.

It is a deciduous tree, usually growing to 16 m in height, with dark brown bark and a high, wide-crowned canopy of shiny compound : Sadiki Ts, Tshisikhawe Mp, Potgieter Mj. Pterocarpus angolensis DC is an angiosperm plant that belongs to the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae.

It is a deciduous tree, usually growing to 16 m in height, with dark brown bark and a high, wide-crowned canopy of shiny compound leaves.

1. Introduction. Pterocarpus angolensis D.C. is widely distributed throughout Africa south of the equator, and its timber is much sought after for wood-carving and carpentry.

According to Vermeulen (), it is one of the most valuable hardwood species in this part of the African has a number of common names from the different countries in the region, but in South Africa is most.

The 6 chapters of this monograph on the African species Pterocarpus angolensis are: (1) Introduction - taxonomy and nomenclature; (2) Species characteristics - morphology, phenology, reproduction biology, vegetative growth; (3) Ecology - distribution and range, habitat, injurious agencies, human influences; (4) Timber properties and uses - dimensions, general description, mechanical properties.

Description and Ecology of Pterocarpus angolensis in Namibia F. Graz Polytechnic of Namibia; P/BagWindhoek, Namibia [email protected] Abstract The tree Pterocarpus angolensis is an important component of the dry woodland savanna of northern Namibia.

Its timber provides the basic resource for much of the carvings in Namibia. Ruvu Forest Reserve is among coastal forests in Tanzania that has been impacted by the increased anthropogenic activities. It was determined the plant species composition, diversity and indigenous trees regeneration growth size structure in the degraded Ruvu South Forest.

Transect method was used to collect data that were treated using t-test. Pterocarpus angolensis is a hardwood species subject to heavy exploitation throughout miombo woodlands of south-central Africa.

Rates of natural recruitment measured in western Tanzania were found to be low, with only a third of parent trees generating any. PDF | On Jan 1,Witness Mojeremane published A review of Pterocarpus angolensis DC. (Mukwa) and important and threatened timber species of the miombo woodlands |.

Observations on growth behaviour of naturally regenerated and irrigated nursery seedlings ofPterocarpus angolensis were made in Morogoro, Tanzania. Following their natural survival strategy, seedlings build up a robust taproot.

The above-ground shoot produced in a year dies back in the field during the dry period whereas the taproot expands during the rainy seasons. Pterocarpus angolensis can withstand temperatures 2,15,27,28 as low as 4°C.

DESCRIPTION OF THE TREE. Pterocarpus angolensis is a deciduous tree with a straight stem and leafy open flat or rounded spreading cr It is a medium to large sized tree growing up to 16 m high, reaching 28 m under favourable conditions 3, Pterocarpus angolensis D.C: field survival strategies, growth, root pruning and fertilization in the nursery.

Fertilizer Research – Fertilizer Research – CrossRef Google Scholar. Pterocarpus angolensis grows in the warm, frost-free areas in the northeast of the country, extending into Zimbabwe, northern Botswana, Mozambique and Namibia and northwards into other parts of Africa. It grows in bushveld and woodland where the rainfall is above mm per year, and it favours rocky slopes or well-drained, deep, sandy soil.

2 Population size structure and recruitment rate in Pterocarpus angolensis, an exploited tree species in miombo woodlands, Tanzania Abstract Pterocarpus angolensis D.C.

is a leguminous tree indigenous to the East African mainland. Its distribution corresponds. iNaturalist: Pterocarpus angolensis IPNI (International Plant Names Index): Pterocarpus angolensis JSTOR Plant Science: Pterocarpus angolensis Kew Herbarium catalogue: Pterocarpus angolensis Mansfeld World Database of Agricultural and Horticultural Crops: Pterocarpus angolensis Plants of the World Online: Pterocarpus angolensis.

Leguminosae is an economically important family that contains a large number of medicinal plants, many of which are widely used in African traditional medicine. Angola holds a great socio-cultural diversity and is one of the richest floristic regions of the world, with over native Leguminosae species.

This study is the first to assess the medicinal uses of the legumes in Angola and. The Transvaal teak (Pterocarpus angolensis) is being over utilised in its natural habitat, although it is a protected tree in South Africa, Swaziland and phloem sap of this species has several traditional, medicinal uses and the wood is used primarily for furniture and fuelwood.

Paulo Wilfred, Andrew D.C. MacColl, Status of wildlife at trophy hunting sites in the Ugalla Game Reserve of Western Tanzania, Tropical Conservation Science, /, 9, 3, (), ().

Kiaat, Dolfhout, African teak, Bloodwood, Umbila, Mukwa and Mulombe are just some of the many common names of Pterocarpus angolensis, one of the prime timber species of the woodlands of southern names reflect its wide distribution and the many different cultures of people who use this tree in many different ways.Fellowship for the study of the ecology of Pterocarpus angolensis D.C.

("Muninga") in Tanzania. He spent the period February to March in Tanzania, and some of the data collected then have been used to pre-pare the present report. The background to the problem, described at the beginning of Part IV of the report.